Why You Should Report Defective Products

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This is plastered on nearly everything we buy these days—yet how many of us take the time to voice our opinions to these companies? We do, on the other hand, take the time to share how disconnected we feel these conglomerates are from the “little people”, US.

I can honestly say that not until I had my son, did I ever feel the need to contact these companies to share my (dis)satisfaction. Err—correct that, never did I feel that it was my obligation as a mother to share my experiences with these companies. Maybe it was my semi-disposable income or my “on-the-go” lifestyle, but having a child really makes a reality check out of your expenditures and choice of products.

20131202_205715When my son was four months old, I had purchased an economy pack of Pampers Swaddlers, which I find to be the elite diaper for our needs. The second sleeve of diapers had obviously been overheated in the manufacturing process—Elmo’s face stretched wide like it was newspaper ink to silly puddy, but most importantly the leg leak-guard had melted to the mesh on the diaper, rendering the diaper useless. I was out almost 50 diapers of the 100 pack I purchased. Not to mention my monthly baby budget would be shot with the need for another economy pack of diapers. I called Pampers and within minutes the customer service rep had my information and Pampers issued vouchers covering the cost of my next pack of diapers.

I had another run in recently when I ventured into the “overnight diaper” realm and was sorely let down by the diaper’s ability to retain fluid. Crib sheet change in the middle of the night, need I say more? I called the next day and within a week I received another voucher for the cost of the diapers, to be used towards my next purchase.

Both of these diaper customer service experiences were followed up with their “quality service division” inquiring if they could send a prepaid envelope and have me mail back 2 to 3 of the “defective items” for further quality control prevention studies. Absolutely! I say. There was obviously a problem here.

I feel like a telethon in saying this, but these customer service reps are just waiting for our calls! One call to share information about a defective batch of bottle liners can save a dozen mothers from a trip to the store in winter months—which I think we can all appreciate.

In saying this, let us not forget the importance of a satisfactory call. Just share your experiences with these reps, oft times they will compensate you with membership coupons or vouchers just for taking the time to call. Even an inquiry can often score you savings towards your next purchase. I called Similac when they introduced the Sensitive formula, and explained how nervous I was to make the switch for my little guy. They offered free samples via mail, so I could try it cost-free.

Remember that these companies are providing us with the service of a product that makes our lives easier. And that we, the consumer, in turn, are providing them with a service, in letting them know how their products work for our lives.

About The Author: Lee Ann O’Hara is a full-time mom and real estate agent throughout Southern and Central New Hampshire, specializing with buyers. She currently has one son, Ryeland, and another child on the way, due August of 2014. She is an equine enthusiast, loves the outdoors (regardless of the season), and exploring much of what New England has to offer–for all ages. Ryeland accompanies her on many of her house showings, as well as expeditions throughout the Granite State and neighboring areas. You can view her contact information and reach out to her at: www.verani.com/leeannohara.